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Trump at the UN: Part 3, Iran, Korea and Afghanistan

INTRODUCTION

Part 3 of a 5 Part Series

This series begins with Trump at the UN: Part 1, a Tale of Two Presidents and a Vision

President Trump and Kim Jung UnOn September 24, 2019 President Trump addressed the United Nations. This speech was largely overlooked because on the same day Nancy Pelosi announced her support of what she termed an “impeachment inquiry”.  As his congressional opposition continued to following their penchant for investigation, President Trump continued to go about the business of the country and the world. This series is intended to call attention to President Trump’s important address that has lasting implications for the country and the world.

American Diplomat Paraded During Iran Hostage CrisisThe United States has been at odds with Iran since the 1979 Iranian Revolution and the Hostage Crisis which began on President Carter’s watch and ended moments after President Reagan’s inauguration. The American approach to Iran since 1979, prior to Trump, been not unlike American policy towards China.  If we do business with the Iranians, they will integrate into the world.  There have been periodic sanctions in response to Iranian support of terrorists, and even billions of dollars transferred to the regime under President Obama.  Despite this, there have always been periodic government sponsored demonstrations with the theme: “Death to America.”

In this third part of his UN address, President Trump discusses the realities that exist with Iran and Korea. In Part 2 of his talk, the President recognized the mistaken hope which has lived for nearly five decades that doing business with China would result in a partner rather than an adversary.  It’s clear the lessons of China apply to Iran and Korea as he describes two brutal regimes that mistreat their own people and threaten the world for the benefit of the rulers of those countries.  On the world stage the President affirms American support of Israel.

Even as he is willing to meet with Kim Jung Un, it is clear Trump knows Kim heads a brutal, dangerous regime. Though there have been periodic public displays of respect, it is evident that Trump has taken a reality-based measure of North Korea and of the Taliban.

It seems his business-based experience has taught him that you cannot make progress to a goal without knowledge of the obstacles, nor without interaction with those in opposition. Set the goal, know the opposition, and proceed with a clear view of reality, not hope, as a guide with a planned goal to secure the “blessings of liberty”  for the people he was elected to serve.

PRESIDENT TRUMP AT THE UN, PART 3

IRAN, KOREA AND AFGHANISTAN

PRESIDENT TRUMP:  One of the greatest security threats facing peace-loving nations today is the repressive regime in Iran.  The regime’s record of death and destruction is well known to us all.  Not only is Iran the world’s number one state sponsor of terrorism, but Iran’s leaders are fueling the tragic wars in both Syria and Yemen.

At the same time, the regime is squandering the nation’s wealth and future in a fanatical quest for nuclear weapons and the means to deliver them.  We must never allow this to happen.

To stop Iran’s path to nuclear weapons and missiles, I withdrew the United States from the terrible Iran nuclear deal, which has very little time remaining, did not allow inspection of important sites, and did not cover ballistic missiles.
Following our withdrawal, we have implemented severe economic sanctions on the country.  Hoping to free itself from sanctions, the regime has escalated its violent and unprovoked aggression.  In response to Iran’s recent attack on Saudi Arabian oil facilities, we just imposed the highest level of sanctions on Iran’s central bank and sovereign wealth fund.

All nations have a duty to act.  No responsible government should subsidize Iran’s bloodlust.  As long as Iran’s menacing behavior continues, sanctions will not be lifted; they will be tightened.  Iran’s leaders will have turned a proud nation into just another cautionary tale of what happens when a ruling class abandons its people and embarks on a crusade for personal power and riches.

For 40 years, the world has listened to Iran’s rulers as they lash out at everyone else for the problems they alone have created.  They conduct ritual chants of “Death to America” and traffic in monstrous anti-Semitism.  Last year the country’s Supreme Leader stated, “Israel is a malignant cancerous tumor…that has to be removed and eradicated: it is possible and it will happen.”  America will never tolerate such anti-Semitic hate.

Fanatics have long used hatred of Israel to distract from their own failures.  Thankfully, there is a growing recognition in the wider Middle East that the countries of the region share common interests in battling extremism and unleashing economic opportunity.  That is why it is so important to have full, normalized relations between Israel and its neighbors.  Only a relationship built on common interests, mutual respect, and religious tolerance can forge a better future.

Iran’s citizens deserve a government that cares about reducing poverty, ending corruption, and increasing jobs — not stealing their money to fund a massacre abroad and at home.

After four decades of failure, it is time for Iran’s leaders to step forward and to stop threatening other countries, and focus on building up their own country.  It is time for Iran’s leaders to finally put the Iranian people first.

America is ready to embrace friendship with all who genuinely seek peace and respect.

Many of America’s closest friends today were once our gravest foes.  The United States has never believed in permanent enemies.  We want partners, not adversaries.  America knows that while anyone can make war, only the most courageous can choose peace.

For this same reason, we have pursued bold diplomacy on the Korean Peninsula. I have told Kim Jong Un what I truly believe: that, like Iran, his country is full of tremendous untapped potential, but that to realize that promise, North Korea must denuclearize.

Around the world, our message is clear: America’s goal is lasting, America’s goal is harmony, and America’s goal is not to go with these endless wars — wars that never end.

With that goal in mind, my administration is also pursuing the hope of a brighter future in Afghanistan.  Unfortunately, the Taliban has chosen to continue their savage attacks.  And we will continue to work with our coalition of Afghan partners to stamp out terrorism, and we will never stop working to make peace a reality.

This series starts with Trump at the UN: Part 1,  A Tale of Two Presidents and a Vision 

It continues with Trump at the UN: Part 4, The Western Hemisphere

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